Black Kiss-tory : Code Switch : NPR


Too often, Black history is portrayed as a story of struggle and suffering, completely devoid of joy. So we called up some romance novelists whose work focuses on Black history. They told us that no matter how hard the times, there has always been room for love.

Wild Rain is author Beverly Jenkins’ newest steamy novel.

Harper Collins


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Harper Collins

Wild Rain is author Beverly Jenkins’ newest steamy novel.

Harper Collins


In The Shadow Of ‘Killer King’ : Code Switch : NPR


For decades, residents of Compton and Watts in South Los Angeles had to rely on one particularly troubled hospital for their medical care. A new state-of-the-art hospital replaced it, but faced many of the same challenges: too few beds, too many patients who need serious help, not enough money. Then came the coronavirus.

In The Shadow Of ‘Killer King’

Scenes from Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital in South Los Angeles, which is dealing with the stress of the coronavirus pandemic.

Christopher Fernandez (left), an Intensive Care Unit nurse, speaks to Maria Arechiga, a ICU Charge Nurse, as she moves an intubated COVID-19 patient to a private room at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in South Los Angeles. The patient passed away later that day. The floor was converted to an ICU unit the week before to help with the surplus of COVID-19 patients.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Christopher Fernandez (left), an Intensive Care Unit nurse, speaks to Maria Arechiga, a ICU Charge Nurse, as she moves an intubated COVID-19 patient to a private room at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in South Los Angeles. The patient passed away later that day. The floor was converted to an ICU unit the week before to help with the surplus of COVID-19 patients.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in South Los Angeles.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in South Los Angeles.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Dr. Elaine Batchlor, Chief Executive Officer of Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital, sits in her office.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Dr. Elaine Batchlor, Chief Executive Officer of Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital, sits in her office.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

An ICU nurse helps a COVID-19 patient speak to their family over an iPad.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

An ICU nurse helps a COVID-19 patient speak to their family over an iPad.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Maria Arechiga takes notes on patients from a nurse who is leaving on lunch break in the ICU in a private room that has become a makeshift isolation room with plastic tarp hanging from the doorway.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Maria Arechiga takes notes on patients from a nurse who is leaving on lunch break in the ICU in a private room that has become a makeshift isolation room with plastic tarp hanging from the doorway.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

A triage tent treating presumed COVID-19 patients sits outside of Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

A triage tent treating presumed COVID-19 patients sits outside of Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital.

Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR


The Dangers Of Life As An American 'Nobody'



Marc Lamont Hill untangles the decades of dysfunction that have led to recent racial flash-points in his latest book, Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond. He talks with Gene Demby about the book, and his support for one particularly unconventional approach to making our justice system more fair.


Who Is A Good Immigrant, Anyway? : Code Switch : NPR


You might call “Dreamers” the most sympathetic characters in the immigration reform drama. But what happens when advocates try to champion an illegal immigrant who’s a felon? Adrian and Shereen explore how advocates are challenging the narrative of the “good” and “bad” immigrant.

Immigration rights protesters march during a May Day rally to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention center in Los Angeles, Calif. in 2016.

Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images


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Immigration rights protesters march during a May Day rally to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention center in Los Angeles, Calif. in 2016.

Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images


“I’m Not Black I’m O.J.” : Code Switch : NPR


From the Code Switch archives: Gene talks with Ezra Edelman, director of the ESPN documentary “OJ: Made in America.” For a long time, O.J. Simpson seemed to be running away from his race. “I’m not black, I’m O.J.!” he’d tell his friends. Gene and Ezra consider O.J.’s identity beyond the frame of the so-called “Trial of the Century.” (A warning, this episode has some racially charged language.)


Everyone Is Talking To Barry Jenkins But Our Interview Is The Best : Code Switch : NPR


Just kidding. But seriously, “Moonlight,” Jenkins’ new film, is the movie of the moment. Gene talks with him about what it took to get the movie made, what it was like to film in the Miami projects where he grew up, and – yep – the theme of black masculinity.

Alex Hibbert and Mahershala Ali, from a scene in “Moonlight.

David Bornfriend/Courtesy of A24


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David Bornfriend/Courtesy of A24

Alex Hibbert and Mahershala Ali, from a scene in “Moonlight.

David Bornfriend/Courtesy of A24


Apocalypse Or Racial Kumbaya? America After Nov. 8 : Code Switch : NPR


In just a few days, the election will be over. But the racism, anger and fear that have surfaced will still be with us. Gene and Shereen talk with Carol Anderson, historian and author of “White Rage,” and Whitney Dow, creator of the Whiteness Project, about what happens to those feelings after Nov. 8.

The presidential campaign has surfaced a lot of xenophobia and racism. What happens after Election Day? Will Americans come together - or will that fear and resentment grow deeper?
The presidential campaign has surfaced a lot of xenophobia and racism. What happens after Election Day? Will Americans come together - or will that fear and resentment grow deeper?